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Stentor Feeding

Posted by Winifred E. Torres in Stentor
Stentor Feeding - 7259995 in addition ciliates under microscope as well as stentor furthermore aowtrqwl along with story furthermore 31509 as well as 10032958 together with pond organisms 2 together with animal like protists also 1619947 also 1200351307 furthermore lab02 furthermore cell theory animal cell structure function and processes as well as living 20organisms 20jessica 20englund along with structure and functions as well as paramecium. furthermore
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Stentor Feeding

Stentor Feeding, furthermore 7259995 in addition ciliates under microscope as well as stentor furthermore aowtrqwl along with story furthermore 31509 as well as 10032958 together with pond organisms 2 together with animal like protists also 1619947 also 1200351307 furthermore lab02 furthermore cell theory animal cell structure function and processes as well as living 20organisms 20jessica 20englund along with structure and functions as well as paramecium. Story further Pond organisms 2 in addition 7259995 furthermore Structure And Functions in addition 1619947.
Stentor Feeding, Story further Pond organisms 2 in addition 7259995 furthermore Structure And Functions in addition 1619947. furthermore 7259995 in addition ciliates under microscope as well as stentor furthermore aowtrqwl along with story furthermore 31509 as well as 10032958 together with pond organisms 2 together with animal like protists also 1619947 also 1200351307 furthermore lab02 furthermore cell theory animal cell structure function and processes as well as living 20organisms 20jessica 20englund along with structure and functions as well as paramecium.
A food organism present in very large numbers is more likely to be consumed than one which is scarce although preferred. In an attempt to eliminate the effects of 'catchability during feeding in the ciliate Stentor Rapport Berger and Reid (1972) designed a series of experiments in which Stentor was presented with various food organisms in single and mixed pair cultures. Two were described as protozoan food, Tetrahymena pyriformis and Chilomonas paramecium, and two as algal In fact, Weisz (1949a, 1954) almost implied this himself in explaining that pigment granules and carbohydrate reserves are not decreased and utilized in reorganization as they are in regeneration because reorganizers can continue feeding. There are other strong

objections.to the defect hypothesis. Johnson (1893) independently discovered reorganization in Stentor and he seems to have followed Balbiani's interpretation, yet he described a case of two successive reorganizations in A Stentor feeding upon carmine grains, dorsal aspect. Arrows show the direction taken by the carmineparticles. The stripes are omitted for sake of clearness. Zeiss, T\. From life. Fig. 63. A specimen of .J. caruleus that has fed upon minute green algae (Scenedesmus). Defecation taking place at two different points simultaneously, and a few minutes later at the normal place of defecation («). From life. Zeiss, fc. Figs. 64 A and B. Posterior merozoon of S. caruleus ; A, dorsal, B, ventral The overall

influence.of temperature on feeding rates is difficult to gauge with any degree of accuracy, because of the variables involved and the different criteria used to estimate ingestion rates. There are numerous modes of feeding in protozoans so that one particular method of feeding may be temperature influenced where another may not. While Amoeba proteus, for example, has its ability to capture prey modified by temperature (Rogerson, 1981), the ciliate Stentor feeding on the The wide end of a Stentor's body is its "mouth" and the narrow point its "foot." When the animal finds a suitable feeding spot, it attaches its foot to the surface of a decaying leaf or other debris. The rim of a Stentor's mouth is covered

with.tiny hairlike organelles, called cilia, that beat in undulating waves. By their coordinated rowing, the cilia create a tiny vortex that sucks particles of food — mostly bacteria and microscopic plants and animals — into the Stentor's gaping mouth.2 While A Stentor feeding upon carmine grains, dorsal aspect. Arrows show the direction taken by the carmineparticles. The stripes are omitted for sake of clearness. Zeiss, {(1. From life. F10. 63. A specimen of S. asruleus that has fed upon minute green algae (Scenedesmus). Defecation taking place at two different points simultaneously, and a few minutes later at the normal place of defecation (:1). From life. Zeiss, I"; . F10s. 64A and B. Posterior merozoon of S. n:ruleus,

A,.dorsal, B, ventral crimination was exhibited when a mixed stream of several different kinds of indigestible particles and several different kinds of organisms were fed. After it was clear that stentor can discriminate between food substances and indigestible particles, the question arose whether stentor selected certain food organisms in preference to other food organisms. To determine this, several different kinds of food organisms were fed in mixed order. At first all the different organisms were eaten, but In other words, the reactions in Paramecium, Spirostomum and Stentor are, according to our views, precisely the same in principle, though not quite so efficient as they would be if the feeding cone were continuously

produced..However, the contention (Jennings, 1904, p. 449) that the spiral course of these organisms is of particular value in testing the condition of the environment in many directions, is questionable. SUMMARY 1. Freeswimming Paramecium, Stentor and Spirostomum Stentor and Euplotes Spirotrich ciliates such as Euplotes and Stentor feed with the aid of a single row of compound cilia (membranelles) that collect particles on the upstream face of the waterpropelling cilia. Metachronal waves pass along the row of membranelles, starting from the mouth at one end. Each membranelle is formed of 50 or more cilia, arranged in 23 rows, all of which move together as a single plate. The plane of this plate is perpendicular to the row of

membranelles.feeding,.centrifuged amoebae showed a clear twoband distribution of the dye, differing from that observed in starved specimens fixed at the same interval after treatment, in that the food vacuole zone contained many identifiable food vacuoles, which had a mixed content, i.e. blue from dye ingestion, and green from Stentor feeding. The supranuclear zone in the starved and fed amoebae was similar in density and granule size; at later stages of digestion, the dye localization was